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Friday, 14 March 2008

Why Slags and Slappers are Bad for Britain

What passes for sex "education" nowadays consists of giving school children access to contraception. They will of course interpret this as licence to have sex and end up with the clap or knocked up. The children of these never-married teenage mums who produce litters by their different male partners will be more likely to under-achieve at school, stab each other and generally live a life of crime, degeneracy and welfare dependency at the expense of the taxpayer.

The solution?

1) Pass a law that child benefit and council homes for families is only restricted to the married.

2) Compel every under-aged pregnant girl to reveal who her impregnator was and fine him (or his parents if he is under 18). If she refuses to divulge his identity her parent(s) will be fined £1000. This should discourage the practice of the many British parents (quite often middle class and who ought to know better), who do nothing to stop their adolescent daughters from having sex, quite often in the parental home while under-age.

3) Pass a law that any child born of an underaged mother will be removed from her and put up for adoption.

Vote: Should Scarlett Keeling's mother be prosecuted for aiding and abetting under-aged sex?
http://www.1party4all.co.uk/Home/Account/TopicForm.aspx?topicsId=102

It would seem a little vindictive to propose such a thing, but isn't it time we did something about single motherhood, irresponsible parenting and the societal consequences of condoning illegitimacy and promiscuity?

What is the point of having an age of consent if it is hardly ever enforced?

Either repeal it or enforce it! If it is a criminal offence then it should be perfectly possible to be prosecuted for aiding and abetting a criminal offence.

Should Fiona McKeown, who took her variously-fathered children to Goa, who took Scarlett from school during term time when she must have been preparing for her GCSEs, who thought it was OK for her 15 year old daughter to have a sexual relationship with someone they just met on holiday, be made an example of?

Would it be in the public interest for the Crown Prosecution Service to prosecute a mother so shamelessly negligent that she even now denies that she has been negligent?

Is the world perception that British women are sluts and slappers deserved?

Why should taxpayers be indirectly sponsoring female promiscuity and the societal consequences of this? Wouldn't opportunities for male promiscuity decrease if female promiscuity were discouraged through the withdrawal of child benefit and council housing from single mothers?

Does it need a woman to say this?

You may wish to ask

Stephen Otter
The Chief Constable
Devon and Cornwall Constabulary Headquarters
Middlemoor
Exeter
Devon
EX2 7HQ

and

The Officer in Charge
Bideford Police Station
New Road
Bideford
Torridge
EX39 2BW

08452 777444

if a prosecution might not be in order when all the facts are already made out below:

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/pages/live/articles/news/worldnews.html?in_article_id=532789&in_page_id=1811

Scarlett smoked cannabis in Britain, and not, it would seem, the just "once or twice" her mother claimed.

"Scaz - always ravin, goin out, getting stoned and bein off her face," reads one of several similar badly spelt internet tributes to the dead girl.

Her relationship with Scarlett was "trusting and honest" - more like a friend than a parent. And therein, perhaps, lay the root of many of Scarlett's problems.

For there was a similarly "matey" approach to the subject of sex. Scarlett had a boyfriend in Britain and was sexually active. But her mother only found out about this after Scarlett told her she had been to the family planning clinic.

"We had talked about it and I was aware she was having a relationship and I was OK about that," was Fiona's rather laid-back view.



Sexual Offences Act 2003

Section 9
SEXUAL ACTIVITIY WITH A CHILD
(1) A person aged 18 or over (A) commits an offence if—
(a) he intentionally touches another person (B),
(b) the touching is sexual, and
(c) either—
(i) B is under 16 and A does not reasonably believe that B is 16 or over, or (ii) B is under 13.
(2) A person guilty of an offence under this section, if the touching involved—
(a) penetration of B’s anus or vagina with a part of A’s body or anything else,
(b) penetration of B’s mouth with A’s penis,
(c) penetration of A’s anus or vagina with a part of B’s body, or
(d) penetration of A’s mouth with B’s penis, is liable, on conviction on indictment, to imprisonment for a term not exceeding 14 years.
(3) Unless subsection (2) applies, a person guilty of an offence under this section is liable—
(a) on summary conviction, to imprisonment for a term not exceeding 6 months or to a fine not exceeding the statutory maximum or both;
(b) on conviction on indictment, to imprisonment for a term not exceeding 14 years.

Section 14

ARRANGING OR FACILITATING COMMISSION OF A CHILD SEX OFFENCE
(1) A person commits an offence if—
(a) he intentionally arranges or facilitates something that he intends to do, intends another person to do, or believes that another person will do, in any part of the world, and
(b) doing it will involve the commission of an offence under any of sections 9 to 13
(2) A person does not commit an offence under this section if—
(a) he arranges or facilitates something that he believes another person will do, but that he does not intend to do or intend another person to do, and (b) any offence within subsection (1)
(b) would be an offence against a child for whose protection he acts.
(3) For the purposes of subsection (2), a person acts for the protection of a child if he acts for the purpose of—
(a) protecting the child from sexually transmitted infection,
(b) protecting the physical safety of the child,
(c) preventing the child from becoming pregnant, or
(d) promoting the child’s emotional well-being by the giving of advice, and not for the purpose of obtaining sexual gratification or for the purpose of causing or encouraging the activity constituting the offence within subsection (1)(b) or the child’s participation in it.
(4) A person guilty of an offence under this section is liable—
(a) on summary conviction, to imprisonment for a term not exceeding 6 months or a fine not exceeding the statutory maximum or both;
(b) on conviction on indictment, to imprisonment for a term not exceeding 14 years.

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