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Sunday, 6 April 2014

Archbishop of Canterbury and Cardinal Nicholls displaying the intellectual and moral bankruptcy of modern Christianity

Cardinal Vincent Nicholls and Archbishop Justin Welby come together for the first time with an exclusive interview.

Archbishop of Canterbury: Flibby-Flabby, Happy-Clappy, Carey-Sharey
The feebleness of his protest against gay marriage is tantamount to endorsement.
All Anglican clergymen who are in favour of gay marriage have the blood of African Christians on their hands.  This knowledge is unlikely to change anything, however.  They might dedicate a few prayers to these Africans while they merrily "marry" same sex couples in church.  You know that Christianity has now reached the end of the line and hit the buffers. 

Listen to this joke of an interview whose content is overwhelmingly cant, hot air and incoherent nonsense.

LISTEN TO GOD, HEAR THE POOR.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b03zxmyh From 28th minute

JW:

It's Lent and therefore a time for prayer and action and we were talking earlier in the year about what we could do to celebrate Lent to reflect the joy of Christian faith during Lent and we thought prayer was essential but when you pray and when you spend time seeking God and listening to God you find that you are drawn inexorably to the face of the poor and you see that in one of the great Lentern readings which is the parable of the sheep and the goat in Matthew's Gospel that at the Last Judgment Jesus points people to the poor that they have either recognised or neglected so we thought that we needed to bring those two areas together - prayer - and it was the Cardinal who came up with the phrase "Listen to God, hear the poor." [Nice safe subject to stick to when Britain is already over 50% slut and bastard. http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/uknews/2285670/Most-children-of-British-mothers-born-out-of-wedlock.html and becoming like Jamaica where the 85% of mothers http://jamaica-gleaner.com/gleaner/20070204/focus/focus2.html are SSMs. https://www.facebook.com/pages/Should-Spinster-Single-Mothers-be-lashed-100-times/417696111659379]

ES:

Cardinal, you are going later today to a house for homeless people which is named after the father of one of the Guildford Four.  What should we read into that?

VN:

The choice of the name to dedicate Giuseppe Conion was I think a tribute to the suffering he went through and also to the fact that this house is a place for destitute refugees and asylum seekers, so it is recognising sometimes that processes of law are very costly and very very demanding indeed.  Indeed, the house is run by a group called the Catholic Workers' Movement and it goes back to Dorothy Day who founded this international network of houses of hospitality for people in real difficulties and she said "Our rule is the works of mercy and we are going to this house today to see this expression of God's mercy who always hears the cry of the poor. [Catholic Church = more women encouraging more immigration]

ES:

Isn't it striking that you are doing it as a double act, without being facetious about it?  Justin Welby, does that reflect the fact that this area - the area of the poor and marginalised people - a priority for you in a way that it wasn't for quite the same way as your predecessors?

JW:

I certainly wouldn't want to say that about either of our predecessors.  I think it was always a massive priority.  It's that our churches are respectively more and more engaged in social action around the country with food banks, with the impact of seeing and hearing what we hear through the huge number of children we educate, through night shelters and through more things that one can begin to recount and as we have done that we have increasingly recognised that God has called us together and that this isn't some sort of a stunt but an inevitable response to the work of the Holy Spirit in drawing us into co-operation.  My predecessor Rowan Williams said at one point that the job of the Church is to see what God is doing and get alongside there and do it with Him and certainly as we what God is doing we find Christians are working together regardless of church and so it seemed appropriate for us to go together. [Meaningless waffle]

ES:

Vincent Nicholls, you attracted some headlines recently when you talked about a related area - the government's welfare reforms and you used the word "disgrace" in relation to those.  Is what you are doing this week principally about what you might call political advocacy or it about the Church's practical part in all this - its role in helping people who are poor, who are in need?

VN:

I am glad to have another opportunity to clarify what I said which was that people living in destitution is a disgrace in a country as rich as ours and I think [corporately?] with the government we have to find ways of making sure that the destitution of people today is not a reality we can afford to support those who are destitute at the moment, but I think the main thrust what we are trying to do, to use an ecclesiastical word, is the work of evangelisation.  We know that the gospel gathers credibility when it seen in action, and when you think back to Cardinal Hume, it was he with others that started the whole move that eventually found that Giuseppe Conion had been wrongly imprisoned. That was one of the things he is remembered for and it is when we put faith into action that it gets the edge of credibility which is what we as servants of the gospel want to give it.  [Meaningless waffle]

ES:

Let me just stay with this, Cardinal.  Do you think, looking at the sort of work that both Churches do - in looking after people in need - do you think that you are being made to make up for the failures in the way that the welfare state is working at the moment?

VN:

I think what is perfectly clear is that our capacity and understanding of welfare is delivered and what its origins are is developing.  This is a country that is facing quite a considerable financial crisis.  Maybe we are coming out of it, and we have to in the first instance try and make sure that all sources of goodwill and charity are used.  There is a much larger debate to say where charity ends and where state responsibility begins, but that's the politicians' debate.  My urging - my desire to see action develop - is to try and address poverty. [Meaningless waffle]

ES:

Sorry, I am not clear if you have answered my question.  Do you think you are being forced to make up for the failures of the way the welfare system is working?

VN:

I think the phrase "failures in the welfare system" is precisely the debate that is taking place.  What is the relationship between a welfare system and the work of people looking after their neighbours and that is a debate that is going on for much longer and personally I am open to looking at the balance between the two factors.  I think it is quite proper that there is within the Christian imperative a desire to help those who are in need and that is something I want to foster. [Meaningless waffle]

ES:

Let me pick that up with you, Archbishop, because you in a speech recently made a distinction between politics and party politics.  I will just read, if I may.  You obviously know what you said, but just so our listeners have an idea:

"Politics is the art and science of securing the common good of the communities from government.  Party politics is a mechanism we use as a society to make decisions about who governs."

Is that a real distinction because if you've got an idea what can secure the common good and the community, you have a clear idea of who can deliver that, surely?

JW:

No, not necessarily because you go right back to the time when William Temple and the end of the Second World War and the development of the welfare state, there has always been significant debate in exactly the way Cardinal Nicholls said as to the respective roles of charity, of non-governmental organisations, of churches, and the role of government - the collective.  Party politics is a separate thing.  We are aware that for the past ten years there has been an extensive and often very well-informed debate about welfare and the way it should go, and that debate continues, and I think we are being very careful not to say that so and so is right and therefore vote for them or some extraordinary thing like that. [Claire Khaw: "Politics is the practice of imposing the right kind of morality on others."]

ES:

But the implication of giving a particular view of what constitutes a proper administration of the welfare system effectively does stray into that territory, doesn't it?

JW:

No, it is straightforward politics: do we need a welfare system?  Everyone agrees we do.  [The welfare state is undeniably dysgenic.]  Who has the best approach to dealing with it that minimises dependency, that encourages people in work, that permits people to lead their own lives, to flourish as individuals, and, as Cardinal Nicholls was saying a few moments ago, particularly tackles issues around destitution and the protection of the most vulnerable in our society? [All the parties do is bribe one group of voters with the money of the other.]

ES:

Let me pick up on that phrase "the common good", but actually with you, Cardinal.  In what sense do you think the understanding the two of you have as Christian leaders of that phrase differs from that of a politician?  What is distinction about your interpretation of the common good?

VN:

My understanding of the common good and the understanding that is rooted in Catholic Social Teaching is that the common good is like a multiplication.  If you put a nought in it, it comes out as a nought.  So if a group of people are outside the scope of the common good it is not the common good, it is simply a utilitarian sum of "Let's do the best we can for the most we can" but that is not the Catholic understanding of the common good, which is of course rooted in the absolute dignity of every person, and I think that is what Pope Francis is so effective in showing. [Meaningless waffle]

ES:

And you are saying that that is distinctive, would you, from what a politician might be saying?

VN:

I think politicians make calculations and say how far can we reach this realistically, and that is a worthy thing to do, please don't misunderstand me, but I think the challenge of that Catholic Social Teaching presents is that nobody is excluded from the common good. [Meaningless waffle]

JW:

I think, Ed, that one of the things that it is important to distinguish between is the common good and the general interest.  The general interest is an economic calculation and looks at the human being as essentially an economic entity.  The common good looks at the human being as someone who is created and loved by God and for whom Jesus Christ died on the cross, and therefore someone who is far more than an economic entity, and the common good looks at the flourishing of every human being and that is why Pope Benedict XVI for example in one of his Encyclicals brings in the idea of a gratuity, an extra of givingness in the way the economy works of a surplus that is spread around without thought of return because of the infinite value of every human being, as shown by Jesus Christ. [Meaningless waffle]

ES:

I'd like to move on to a couple of things I want to talk about while we've got time. Cardinal, you are about to chair a meeting in Rome on the question people trafficking.  You've got some high-ranking people from Britain and people from all over the world coming.  What in a practical sense do you think you can achieve and why is it the Church's business?  I don't mean morally but in practical terms.

VN:

In practical terms this meetings brings together Catholic leaders and senior police officers, lead police officers from twenty different countries, and the reason being is because our experience here in London is that the network of Catholic religious women and others can be set against a network of  international human trafficking, so what we found here is that charities and particularly from my point of view religious women offer the support and safe houses that people who are either trafficked or been rescued from it desperately need it, and the international link is there because they can ring up fellow religious women women who are religious in the country from which these women have been brought and say "Can you help bring them home?" This conference is not about the theory of trafficking, it is not about global networks of supply routes but it's about how can we as the Catholic Church with these religious women, particularly, who are invaluable, how can we put that effort alongside the police in combating this crime which is the second most profitable crime in the world.  [Catholic Church obeying the imperative of the matriarchy who want only sluts ie fornicatresses, who are lower than prostitutes, to control the supply of sex.]

ES:

Archbishop, you have just signed an initiative with the Catholic Church with the Pope to work on the same issue, is that right?

JW:

That came out of the visit I had with the Pope last summer, last June, and, talking about this together at great length over lunch and from that we signed with the very strong support of an Australian industrialist who is very deeply committed to this area, we signed something to set up what is called the Global Freedom Network which is tackling trafficking and modern slavery and it seems to be something that has a great deal of momentum about it. You've got the Slavery and Anti-slavery Bill going through the Houses of Parliament at the moment which the government has introduced and Britain is leading in this area in terms of government action with all party support and the Global Freedom Network aims to tackle and undermine trafficking and human slavery in the next five to ten years. [Catholic Church obeying the imperative of the matriarchy who want only sluts ie fornicatresses, who are lower than prostitutes, to control the supply of sex.]

ES:

And in practical terms is it going to make a real difference?

JW:

The proof of the pudding is in the eating as they say, but there's a huge amount of resource going into it. [Lots of Catholic money being wasted obeying the imperative of the matriarchy who want only sluts ie fornicatresses, who are lower than prostitutes, to control the supply of sex.]

ES:

Just to draw you in on something you said earlier this week on the question of same-sex marriage.  It got headlines and you appeared to be saying that if the Church of England endorsed it here it would put the lives of Christians at risk in the developing world.  Was that what you meant, and do you stand by it?

JW:

What I meant and what I said was that what we do here has a global impact.  It has an impact on our ecumenical relations and our interfaith relations and on the lives of Christians, particularly Anglican Christians around the world, and I recounted a particular episode where following events somewhere else in the world Christians had been attacked in a part of sub-Saharan Africa and I had been ministering to a place where they had been attacked and there had been almost 370 people there, and what I am saying is that it doesn't mean it dictates exactly what we do but it says that when we do something we need to be aware of the consequences and we need to think it through very carefully and we need to do it together.  We can't just go off by ourselves as though we were a church entirely alone in the world.  [Yep, African Christians are going to be murdered by those who associate being Christian with gay marriage. It is after all the religion of white people who started all this demented liberal crap.  Do you think the LGBT give a toss about dead African Christians?  They already despise European Christians. Why would they care about foreign black African Christians? Cameron has blood on his hands.  Welby is just going through the motions of telling us what will happen to African Christians if we continue to celebrate gay marriage in the West, but most won't care.  Those of us who do care are despised and abused as fascists AKA social conservatives.  Apart from increasing the degeneracy and dementia of the West, gay marriage will also diminish the numbers of Christians worldwide who will either be killed by those who despise them for adhering to a faith whose leaders live in countries whose Prime Ministers and Presidents promote gay marriage or Christians will just convert to Islam to avoid death, immorality and dementia, thus increasing the total number of Muslims worldwide. Out of evil comes good, and out of good comes evil.]

4 comments:

Anonymous said...

The Church of England does not represent Christianity, as they are schismatic and not in communion with the Bishop of Rome.

If you want to be truly aware of Christian truth, doctrine and the status of our faith, read the Catechism of the Catholic Church and spend time with Catholic traditionalists.

Claire Khaw said...

I have already met Bishop Williamson and am aware of his objections to Vatican II.

However, since he is practically excommunicated and does not have the resource of the Church behind him, there is not much to be done about the propagation of the social conservatism that came with traditional Catholic moral teaching.

Anonymous said...

Schismatics (SSPX and the like) aren't the voice of the Church either! Traditionalist Catholics who remain attached to the Latin Mass and in Communion with the Bishop of Rome don't necessarily need to agree with the reforms of Vatican II completely, but that doesn't invalidate it either.

Claire Khaw said...

The divisions within Christianity are so many, wide and deep as to render it as unfit for purpose as a religion.