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Wednesday, 22 February 2017

Ted "Malevolent" Malloch shocks and awes his detractors with a triumphalist Trumpian vision of the future

































JD:

What is the old order being replaced? What does the New Order look like?

TM:

There are a number of elements, I think. On the international side, the most important element is the movement away from this idea of expert global elite determining our future which is after all the socialists' goal towards a more state-centric national participation by people in decision-making so that pendulum has swing and is swinging all across Europe. Brexit is evidence of that and the coming elections this year. That is a major shift ideologically and otherwise. That is in fact a turning point in world history. The other turning point I would suggest is this notion that the economy can be run for the good and benefit of all the people instead of just a few people, and this kind of inclusive capitalism, to use a phrase, is something that I think Donald Trump will prevail on. It certainly has free market orientation. It is not overly protectionist, but it will provide a degree of economic growth through a number of means both by infrastructure builds and by taxation etc to make the American economy frankly the engine of growth in the world economy, and we haven't had that in the recent decade and a half. 

You shouldn't worry about the protectionism too much. You've read The Art of the Deal which I have to keep reminding people is the way to understand Trump thinks, works and has acted throughout his entire business career as a transactional business person. There is this degree of bluster. It is a negotiating technique. It is already working. Jobs are coming back to America. You dangle a stick and carrot and sometimes you have to use the stick but it's the threat of that stick so I tell people that it's not going to happen that the world is going to collapse into a trade war, it's just not going to happen. 

I've been working with some people and there's now a panel at the White House on how infrastructure can be orientated towards the private sector. So up until now the view was we give the money back to the mayors and they can do the bridges to nowhere and give them money for their friends to build roads to nowhere that nobody uses so it's all a degree of political cronyism and we use the municipal bond market which is tax exempt to do that. What I'm telling you is that this is being rethought in the White House and there is going to be in this infrastructure package a complete reorientation towards the private sector, not just public-private partnerships, I'm talking about an influx of capital frankly from all over the world to build user-pay infrastructure in the United States. Very exciting prospects. 

THE EU

TM:

To some degree the European Union has put the cart before the horse. They've tried to bring about this political integration which is proving difficult. They have increasingly had a degree of anti-Americanism which is very disheartening particularly when you think of what America has done since the Second World War, the German Marshall Plan and all through the last number of decades for Europe and defending Europe and rebuilding Europe and trading with Europe. There is a degree of ungratefulness, and I find that actually very disturbing, actually very sad. 
 






CULTURAL MARXISM

TM:

Marxism as a philosophy has been bankrupt since Marx penned the words, but like most philsopohies the disciples were more problematic than the originator so there were numbers of Marxists in any of the political regimes around the world, not just in Eastern Europe, and even after the Berlin Wall fell and after the Soviet Union collapsed there were still many Marxists in places as far away as Venezuela and Bolivia and Trotskyites in certain academic institutions ...

JD:

In Yale?

TM:

I'd have to say our far right wing began with Barack Obama. It got more to leftist as you moved on and it was very strange in the left when you believed in all kinds of things. That kind of Cultural Marxism is very much part - if your listeners don't know this - of the academic set. So one should be wary when you're sending your wonderful youth off to universities and paying very princely sums that they actually come back with ideas that you would never invest them with. 
The free speech that existed then [around the time of publication of Allan Bloom's Closing of the American Mind] which still existed then when there could have been a debate has largely dissipated. That doesn't exist in the academy any longer. 

I believe there is something akin to a Cultural War.  

JD:

Your prediction for the next eight years?

TM:

There's going to be a lot of protests circling President Trump as we've seen already some of it paid for by external sources - George Soros and people on the left - some of it violent in nature, which is very discouraging - damaging lives, damaging private property. I am very much in favour of the ability of people to protest peacefully. People say these protests will end after the first month of President Trump's reign or after the first one hundred days, I don't want to be discouraging, but I think it will go on the entire eight years. 

JD:

And your prediction for Europe? How long before it breaks up completely?

TM:

Oh my goodness. I have no prediction whatsoever and I wouldn't want to be an actor in such a thing. How could you even suggest it? 

JD:

I don't know where I got that idea from, it must have been some rubbish I read in the papers or something.

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