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Tuesday, 11 July 2017

The irresistible appeal of nationalism to those who reject consumerism and hedonism

Man cannot live on bread alone. His soul is hungry for the recognition of his unique qualities, even if he does not in fact possess them. He does not want to be a fungible commodity, which is what globalism turns us into. To escape from this state of being fungible, we want to belong to a tribe or a nation, and through this group elevate ourselves as individuals.

Our spiritual hunger for this recognition of our unrealised distinctiveness and uniqueness is of course the essential appeal of nationalism. If we lack the ability to be special and distinctive as individuals, we want our nation at least to be unique and special or be allowed to think so, free from the straitjacket of political correctness. This is the purpose of the Noble Lie. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Noble_lie

The creation myth of a nation is akin to knowing one's parents, is it not?

Those of us who know our parents, grandparents and lineage are immeasuralby spiritually and socially more secure than the abandoned orphan who never even knew his own mother. The tragedy of Oedipus is based entirely on the necessity of knowing who we are, where we came from and how we came to be where we now are.

Much of nationalism is tied up in ideas of family and tribe, but most of all the idea family and our parents. Our father and mother may be just like any other man or woman but they are special because they are our parents. Our child may be just like any other child but is special because it is the fruit of our loins, bone of our bone, blood of our blood, flesh of our flesh. And that must be why people used to call their country the Motherland or the Fatherland, before the days of Political Correctness.

Feminism in the West has orphaned the white man from his roots and traditions.

The Bhagavad Gita:

Out of the corruption of women proceeds the corruption of races; out of the corruption of races, the loss of memory; out of the loss of memory, the loss of understanding, and out of this all evil.


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