Tuesday, 20 March 2018

Transcript and commentary of Germaine Greer being interviewed by Mishal Husain on the subject of career rapees #MeToo

http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b09vyvt2  From 2:21

http://www.howtoacademy.com/conferences/metoo-movement-gone-too-far-debate

Mishal Husain:


The Me Too Movement has gone too far - an assertion that will be debated tonight at an event in London. The writer and feminist professor Germaine Greer will be arguing for the motion.  She has previously said in relation to Harvey Weinstein: "If you spread your legs because he said 'Be nice to me and I'll give you a job in a movie' then that is tantamount to consent and it is too late to start whingeing. She's in our radio car now. Good  morning.  In what way do you think Me Too has gone too far?



Germaine Greer:


I don't actually think it's gone too far. I don't think it's got anywhere at all. We're still in the situation where you've got a storm of allegations about Weinstein, the collapse of his business and this isn't what we need. What we need is to sort out the law regarding rape and to sort out our concept of what it is, and it is pointless now to bring up all this stuff when with most of it no action will be taken because of the statute of limitations. Why wait 20 years?


Mishal Husain:


The reason why I phrased the question that way is because you will be arguing in favour of the motion that the Me Too Movement has gone too far tonight.
 

Germaine Greer:

Well, that's what the public has been told. I've pleaded with John Gordon not to do that because I don't think it's gone too far and I don't think we should be debating as if we all disagree. What's clear to me is that the law regarding rape does not work and people's concept of what is rape are very confused: some people think it's a crime of violence when violence is not necessarily involved at all.



Mishal Husain:

I want to come to your views on rape in just a moment because I know you are writing a book on that subject at the moment, but let's just stick to the Me Too Movement and what we have learned from that because there is a whole range of behaviours that is being called out under that hashtag and through that movement.  What is the problem with that? Is there any problem with people calling out behaviour that is inappropriate as well as unlawful?



Germaine Greer:

I'm the person who would call it when it happened and wouldn't have been sitting around being quiet and keep a secret which wasn't even a secret when it came to Weinstein, for example. People knew about it. A wire had been used in an interview with an actress who had been with Weinstein which was in the possession of the New York Police. It is extraordinary that the industry kept quiet.



Mishal Husain:

It doesn't mean that everyone who went to see him would have been aware of the existence of a tape like that. What I'm wondering is whether you think there has been something valuable in Me Too encouraging people to do exactly what you say you have always been able to do which is make a fuss about things like that when they happen?



Germaine Greer:


Do I think it's valuable now? I'm not sure. I thought the Golden Globe's performance where everyone wore black was amazingly stagey and contrived when you've got a real situation. The Me Too name itself comes from a movement that existed from the turn of the century in the South where I think you've got something like 700,000 agricultural workers who'd been seriously sexually assaulted and it's Tarana Burke who invented the name which she then found taken and used for showbiz. There is an aspect of the whole performance which is ballyhoo and Hollywood. The whole thing about it, the whole extraordinary exposure to so many in the case of Weinstein is 84 complainants who had opportunities to speak out some of whom have been paid six figure sums in the form of non-disclosure agreements. That's a dishonourable thing to accept, and it's not something you should boast about. It also happens to be legally binding.



Mishal Husain:

But Me Too is much broader, isn't it, than those 84 accusers of one particular man. It's about women all over the world feeling that they can say things which were previously ignored or for which there were serious repercussions and it has helped them articulate and be listened to.



Germaine Greer:

Well, I hope that's the case if indeed it is. I'm not sure because what's happened in the case of Weinstein's assistant Zelda Perkins is that she was put through absolute hell when she tried to get some sort of redress, her whole life was taken over, I mean, the amount of legal muscle that will be used to defend these people is massive, and I am concerned for damage limitation rather than maximisation, rather than wrecking people's lives, so they become career rapees, as it were. We have cases which concern rather more, I might say, of what's been happening on American campuses in the last few years and now we have had the Dear Colleague Letter that made it mandatory for universities to investigate complaints of sexual abuse that has been rescinded for the very good reason that it didn't work. None of the things we are doing actually work to protect women from abuse.

https://www.dailywire.com/news/20790/betsy-devos-correct-rescind-dear-colleague-letter-elliott-hamilton

Mishal Husain:

So what are you saying will work then, what are you advocating?



Germaine Greer:


[Sardonic laugh] That's a good question. Well, I'm actually interested in what's going on, I mean, I'm interested in the fact that Sweden, for example, has a much wider spectrum on sexual abuse than the rest of Europe, but the result is that Sweden has three times the number of rape cases of any country in Europe, of 35 countries in Europe. [Reminder: the sluttier the women, the higher the number of rape complaints. We all know how infamously promiscuous Scandinavian women are too, do we not?]



https://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/europe/sweden-and-denmark-have-highest-number-of-sexual-assaults-in-europe-a6800901.html

https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2011/jan/05/julian-assange-sex-crimes-anonymity

Mishal Husain:

Are you saying that's a good thing or a bad thing?



Germaine Greer:

Well, it's not over. We haven't got to a conclusion. We are going to have to examine the whole category of sexual abuse and we are going to have to understand what the relative gravity of these offences is, I mean, what they did on campuses in America was lighten the degree of proof that had to be alleged [Germaine Greer means lower the standard of proof] so it became "the preponderance of evidence by 51%". I don't think you can do that. You can't undermine civil liberties in order to get some sort of a conviction. It won't have any effect on the figures.



Mishal Husain:

When you said recently that "My feeling is that we should ditch rape altogether as a crime because it is hopeless," did you mean that?


Germaine Greer:

Well, I didn't mean we should make sexual assault legal. The actual crime of rape itself is a medieval survival and it deals with the stealing of a woman from her menfolk. Well, we don't even accept that concept now so now it turns on consent and that means you've got a narrative from the woman, a narrative from the man, and you've got to believe one or the other. Can you put someone away for seven years, or more, depending? The penalties for rape are huge when callous and indifferent treatment of women that is very damaging to their self-esteem is practically universal and certainly diurnal as it happens to all kinds of relationships.



Mishal Husain:

I'm still not sure what you are actually advocating as rape exists as a crime all over the world and there is a process of evidence that is undertaken in order to establish the principle of consent. What is wrong with that?



Germaine Greer:

What's wrong with it is that it doesn't work. We work out very few cases in England out of the total number of rape reports ...



Mishal Husain:


Convictions, you mean.



Germaine Greer:

... a tiny percentage of them. No, no, I mean they don't even get to court, but also rape doesn't occur in the context of court and prison - it's a part of every day life - and we have to understand the way that it works within heterosexual relationships.



Mishal Husain:

[Audibly sighing with relief at the end of this interview that she no longer has to unpick what Germaine Geeer is trying to say for the benefit of listeners or ask "How does rape work within heterosexual relationships?"] Germaine Greer, thank you very much.




MY PROPOSALS ON HOW TO CONDUCT RAPE TRIALS AND WHAT PUNISHMENT TO METe OUT TO WOMEN MAKE MALICIOUS AND FALSE RAPE ACCUSATIONS




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Potential money-making scheme for slags participating in gangbangs at the expense of the UK taxpayer

The BNP, Jim Dowson, Shelley Rose and Khalwat

How to solve the problem of rape complaints

How to deal with false rape allegations

A suggested new way of conducting rape trials under feminazi DPP's new rule that accused must prove complainant consented

Men: every time you shag a neurotic drunken malicious slut who claims she can't remember why she had sex with you, you may cost the taxpayer £11,000

What to do with women convicted of making false rape accusations

Is the average juror getting stupider and stupider even as the rules that make a fair trial more likely are done away with by PC libtards and feminists?

1 comment:

KS said...

Actually the subject of women falsely accusing men of rape has been dealt with in the Koran.

If there are witnesses then their testimony as well as the testimonies of the aggrieved party is to be taken. If no witnesses present then Koran says circumstantial evidence be examined.

Sura 60 specifically reprimands believing women that they shall not put forth false charges. As the verse gives a law specifically to women, it is indicative of that women may be more prone to this problem.

The Koran doesn't carry capital punishment for rape. Also it specifies that an aggrieved person, specially if weak and oppressed and vulnerable should be fully heard in a court of law and their grievances, if found genuine should be redressed.

Koranic law is absolutely clear. One is Innocent until proven guilty. People aren't punished just because they have been accused of a crime. The accusation has to be proved through a due judicial process.

For grievous bodily harm Koranic law stipulates compensation commensurate to the injury. Otherwise the person is to be inflicted with punishment equivalent to the injury and pain he caused to his victim. See Sura 5. "Eye for an eye. And wounds have compensation, remission". Rape is actually two offenses. One it is illegal sexual intercourse and two, it is causing personal injury, it can also be kidnapping. .so a number of offenses have been committed. A combined punishment of lashes, monetary fine, incarceration etc can be given, depending on the situation. One who is well versed in Koranic law will adjudicate on the matter.