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Sunday, 22 March 2015

God (if He exists) is Darwinian


Let us take the most pessimistic view of life and creation. Let us assume that God (if He exists) created different nations and peoples to fight each other rewarding the group that follows His laws most faithfully with victory and supremacy over all the others, who deny His existence and flout His laws, or even those who do follow His laws, but not as well as they could be. If God in His wisdom created us only to watch us fight each other, then it is already clear who is going to win in this clash of civilisations between the matriarchal West and ISIS, who appear to be the patriarchy reasserting itself. Let us assume that a rational and perfectly moral God (if He exists) would be Darwinian.

We should not fear over-population, because Nature will take care of that by inflicting on us war, famine and pestilence if and when our numbers becoming unsustainable.

From Outline of English History BC 55 - AD 1910 by Samuel R Gardiner

FIRST PERIOD
Chapter 1 The Britons and the Romans
page 11

The Religion of the English The English did not think it was at all wrong to kill a man. They were heathens, and their religion taught them that men were the better, not for being tender and merciful, but for being strong and bold. Their gods, they thought, showed favour to them if they were fierce and masterful, and would only give them happiness after death if they died fighting.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Social_Darwinism

Zeus:
On Mount Ida I looked into the eternal void, and it asked me this: "Does Zeus own the world, or does the world own Zeus?"

Athene:
You're the Almighty! You own everything! The lot!

Zeus:
That was my first response. But what if there were no Trojans, no Greeks? What if they fought down to the last life? No one to praise or flatter us? Would we still exist?

Hera:
Of course we'd exist, and our lives might be a whole lot easier.

Zeus:
Doing what? Presiding over a world of lillies and kittens? The dandelion won't build temples in our honour, the elephant won't trumpet our names. What would we do? Take pride in the dung beetle while it pushes its ball of shit up and down the dunes? Assist in the spinning of a spider's web?

Athene:
Highly philosophical, I'm sure, but what's your point?

Zeus:
We need believers. People of faith. If we sympathise, rule with a bleeding heart, then we favour the weak, and the weak are fickle and disappointing, diseased. The weak are ... weak. Do we put our future in their shaking hands?

Hera:
Let the powerful survive? Those of the strongest arm? Is that what you're suggesting?

Zeus:
And the quickest hands and the deadliest aim and the sharpest mind. It might be tomorrow or take another ten years, but someone will triumph, either through muscle or brain.

Athene:
And they will be worthy of our praise.

Zeus:
And we of theirs.
The Last Days of Troy by Simon Armitage





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