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Thursday, 9 April 2015

Professor Seena Fazel omits to take into account illegitimacy rates of sex offenders

http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b05pqsk1

A new study suggests genetic factors may play a role in determining how likely someone is to commit sexual offences. Research published in the International Journal of Epidemiology indicates that brothers and fathers of men convicted of sexual offences are up to five times more likely to be convicted of sexual offences than men in the general population. The report authors concluded that genetic factors were found to make a substantial contribution to this increased risk, with the shared family environment having a relatively small influence. The study, conducted by researchers from Oxford University and the Karolinska Institute in Sweden, used statistical methods to analyse data on all 21,566 men convicted of sexual offences in Sweden between 1973 and 2009. Seena Fazel  is the report author and Professor of Forensic Psychiatry, University of Oxford and Dr Bradley Hillier is a consultant in Forensic Psychiatry (working with mentally disordered offenders at South West London and St Georges NHS Trust).

Interview begins at 1:51.

James Naughtie:

The brothers and fathers of convicted sex offenders are 5 times more likely than men in the general population to be sex offenders themselves. This is the claim of researchers who published their findings in the International Journal of Epidemiology. They claim as well that genetic make-up is the key, not the simple fact of being brought up close to an offender, sharing the environment as it were, with them. Let's talk to Professor Seena Fazel who is author of the report and Professor of Psychiatry at the University of Oxford and to Dr Bradley Hillier as well who is consultant in Forensic Psychiatry working in London. Good morning to you both. Professor Fazel first of all, what was your raw material, who did you look at, how big was the group and how long did you study them for?

SF:

It was around 21,000 Swedish convicted sex offenders - they were men - and we looked at them for 37 years so we looked at their family pedigrees over 37 years and examined whether family pedigrees first and second generation relatives were sex offenders.

JN:

And you found a definite link?

SF:

We found a link to the fathers and brothers, as you say, up to a five-fold increased risk of being sex offenders themselves.

JN:

And have you managed to your satisfaction to rule out that that link is something environmental - in other words things that those people were subjected to or saw or felt when they were young were responsible rather than genes?

SF:

The environment does have a contribution but we thought the genetic contribution probably contributed to about 30 to 50% of the risk and we did that by looking at different ways of modelling the family pedigrees so for instance if you take a family where you have a half brother growing up in the same family as a full brother we found quite a large difference in the risk of sexual offending: they are growing up in the same environment yet the only difference is the genetic difference - around 25%. So that was one of the ways that this way of researching it can model these risks.

JN:

Dr Hillier, are you impressed?

BH:

Well, as with any of Professor Fazel's large population studies they do provide valuable insights into the role various factors in offending and in this case the role of genetics, possibly. I think this is something we need to take into account in the understanding of sexual offending which currently is based on attitudes and social learning and being exposed to particular environments.

JN:

So in a way that's easier for us, isn't it? We tend, don't we, to think of impacts on people and trying to either ameliorate those impacts or take those into account when we are trying to treat them. We don't tend to think about genetics because there is nothing we can do about it.

BH:

Perhaps what Dr Fazel is doing is inviting us to take a step back from behaviour and look at causal factors and he is showing some association which may provide future targets for treatment. In terms of treatment I am minded in terms of what your Thought of The Day speaker said in terms of prevention being better than cure, and I work in an organisation called the International Association for Forensic Psychotherapy with international members from Germany where they have the project prevention Dunkelfeld [?] - not anything sinister but it is the dark field that is unseen offending. The network of clinics which has [buy in?] from governments, universities and charities work with people who have concerns about their own risks of sexual offending.

JN:

So, if you come from a family and you sense or are being told that there is a genetic risk of sexual offending you can go yourself and seek help?

BH:

That's right. You can do in Germany but of course in the UK you have a law of mandatory reporting of sexual offences including viewing internet pornography and child pornography on the internet.

JN:

Does it go more widely than this, do you think, Professor Fazel, in other words, are sexual offenders at heart violent offenders? Is there a link that isn't just about sexual offending here, but is a wider one as well, about people's behaviour and the extent to which their behaviour more generally comes from their genes?

SN:

Well, I think there is a bit of both and there is probably a contribution from the genes for instance high impulsivity that leads to violent offending but there may also be something specific to sexual offending and that might also be genetically determined for instance hyper-sexuality or not being able to figure out boundaries in relationships - that might be genetically determined. Prevention is key here and one of the possibilities that this type of work leads you to think towards is that if there are high risk families already receiving services from child and family services or other services it might be that these families can receive other interventions around normal relationships.

JN:

Is this something you would like to see, Dr Hillier?

BH:

Well, this is certainly I'd like to see. I think it is important to bear in mind we are dealing with very small absolute numbers even though this risk is something that in a family level is increased by five-fold in terms of the numbers of the general population that this may affect. We deal with very small numbers and sexual offending does remain a rare event.

JN;

Dr Hillier and Professor Seena Fazel as well, thanks to you both very much.


Since prevention is indeed better than cure, then let us prevent bastards being being born by shaming sluts. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Slut-shaming

The most effective way of shaming sluts can be found at http://quran.com/24/2

Why will no man to discuss this? Because there are no real men any more and because they are scared of sluts in the feminazi-run BBC, where every other producer is female. Self-censorship is much much more insidious than overt censorship and all the men living in a pornocracy are afraid of losing their privileges. Seena Fazel blocked  me on Twitter for saying what I said below, but imagine if all men in the West collectively pretended not to hear or understand what I am saying? Would they be not turning a blind eye to what sluts are doing - breeding yet more degenerate bastards who will turn out to be sex offenders when they grow up? Is this why some young Muslims would rather go join ISIS and die than be part of a pornocratic matriarchy where men whose job it is to investigate the truth and analyse the truth such as journalists routinely look the other way when confronted with it?



Marriage is eugenic, bastardy dysgenic

Claire Khaw's Class and Gender Theory of Western Decline

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